Trucking Industry Stakeholders Square Off Over CDL Test Flexibility

Regulators received heavy opposition from truck owner-operators and safety advocates on a proposal aimed at making it easier to test and employ new drivers. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s proposed rule, “Increased Flexibility for Testing and for Drivers after Passing the Skills Test,” would loosen current CDL testing regulations by allowing commercial learner’s permit (CLP) holders who have passed the CDL skills test to operate a truck without having a CDL holder in the passenger seat, expanding CDL applicants’ ability to take a skills test in a state other than the state in which they live and eliminating the requirement that an applicant wait at least 14 days after being issued a CLP to take the CDL skills test.

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When Must Truckers Complete a Driver Vehicle Inspection Report?

A common misconception about driver vehicle inspection reports for truckers and other commercial drivers is that one is required at every pre-trip inspection. How often must a walk-around pre-trip inspection be conducted? Before every trip. How often is a post-trip inspection required to be performed? After every trip.

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FMCSA Has Rejected 34% of Under-21 Truck Driver Applications

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration says only 113 motor carriers have applied for its under-21 truck driver apprenticeship program since the agency began accepting applications in July 2022, a dismal sign for an initiative that had been expected to recruit up to 1,000 carriers and 3,000 drivers.

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How to Get More Out of Commercial Driver Vehicle Inspection

When Tom Bray was in charge of safety at a motor carrier, a frustration was seeing drivers leave the yard with an easily correctable problem that could result in a violation or worse — but should have been found in a driver vehicle inspection and fixed.

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CVSA’s Roadcheck to Focus on Tractor Protection Systems

In anticipation of this year’s announced International Roadcheck, many motor carriers will undoubtedly be making sure their trucks are in top condition as inspectors will be checking common — and not so common — equipment problems. As usual, law enforcement personnel will inspect commercial motor vehicles and drivers at weigh/inspection stations, temporary sites and mobile patrols in the U.S., Canada and Mexico to verify compliance with federal, state, provincial or territorial regulations. Data from Roadcheck will be collected, and the results will be released this summer.

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Fuel Costs Show Why Transportation Market Is So Challenging For Providers

Retail diesel fuel costs (DTS) are up 33% versus April 2019, while the National Truckload Index (NTI) that measures all-in spot rates are only up 16% over the same time. The implication is that carriers are in a far worse position on the spot market than they were in 2019 as they are unable to fully pass along operating costs.

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Heavy-Truck Emissions Rules: A Disaster in the Making

The American Trucking Associations’ Technology & Maintenance Council has always been a source of important insights into the health and confidence of trucking in North America. But as TMC’s 2024 Annual Meeting wrapped up in New Orleans, I drove away from the Big Easy with a sense that the industry is nowhere near ready for new emissions regulations that start kicking in for the 2027 model year.

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Positive Drug Tests for Truck Drivers Down, FMCSA Says

The number of positive drug tests for marijuana and nearly all other substances identified among truck drivers declined in calendar year 2023 compared with 2022, according to year-end numbers recorded in the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s Drug & Alcohol Clearinghouse. The number of annually recorded marijuana positive tests and 13 other positive-tested substances decreased to 61,443 in 2023 from 68,639 in 2022 — a more than 10% decline.

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States, Provinces Urge Drivers to Prepare for Solar Eclipse

A rare astronomical event next week may cause problems for trucking in some areas. A complete solar eclipse — when the moon will pass in front of the sun — will occur over the middle portion of the United States on Monday, April 8. Portions of 14 states and part of Canada will be plunged into total darkness during daylight hours. The maximum duration of “totality,” as the phenomenon is known, will only last for about four and a half minutes at the most.

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Listen to Drivers — and Respond

Often, reasons for leaving that drivers identify as pay may have more to do with disruptions and uncertainty and confusion that affect pay, rather than the pay package itself. So it makes to ask how things look from their point of view on the operational side of your business. What is that experience like for drivers? Are they facing headaches such as long wait times at shippers and receivers or too much downtime for maintenance that end up affecting their paycheck?

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